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Book Reads and Self-Reflections

Available: January 8 - April 28, 2018

Interested participants may choose any or all of the following books to read and answer self-reflection questions. Participants will earn 0.30 CEU credits toward the Cultural Competency Certificate (C3) for each book and self-reflection form completed. Only the books on this list are available for credit.

Pre-registration are required for these events. Register for these events via WebAdvisor.  If you encounter a problem with registering for these events on WebAdvisor, please contact MMII at 586-498-4031.

After registration, participants will read the selected book, then print and complete the book’s self-reflection questions. Participants must provide complete and thoughtful responses to each question in order to obtain credit.

Return completed answers by April 28, 2018 to: Dr. Cassandra Swiderski, South Campus J-360-3 or Center Campus C 164 during normal business hours.

For questions, please contact the MMII office at: 586-498-4031

Sponsored by the Macomb Multicultural International Initiatives (MMII).

Winter 2018 Book reads


Israel: An Echo of Eternity

In Country by Bobbie Ann Mason

In th summer of 1984, the war in Vietnam came home to Sam Hughes, whose father was killed there before she was born. The soldier-boy in the picture never changed. In a way, that made him dependable. But he seemed so innocent. “Astronauts have been to the moon,” she blurted out to the picture. “You missed Watergate. I was in the second grade.” Bobbie Ann Mason’s message is simple: the war dead are us – we are them – and, whatever political stance we took with regard to Vietnam, we are all Americans united by one past, one flag, one history.

Note: Audio book version of material for this event is available at either Library circulation desk for visually impaired participants.

The 5-digit registration number for this event is: 57948

In Country Self-Reflection Questions


Kitchen

The Quiet American by Graham Greene


While the French Army in Indo-China is grappling with the Vietminh, back in Saigon a young and high-minded American named Pyle begins to channel economic aid to a “Third Force”.
Caught between French colonialists and the Vietminh, Fowler, the narrator and seasoned foreign correspondent, observes: “I never knew a man who had better motives for all the trouble he caused.” As young Pyle’s policies blunder on into bloodshed, the older man finds it impossible to stand aside as an observer. But Fowler’s motives for intervening are suspect, both to the police and to himself: for Pyle has robbed him of his Vietnamese mistress.

Note: Audio book version of material for this event is available at either Library circulation desk for visually impaired participants.

The 5-digit registration number for this event is: 57949

The Quiet American Self-Reflection Questions


The Remains of the Day Self-Reflection Questions

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a “man of two minds,” a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity in America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship.

Note: Audio book version of material for this event is available at either Library circulation desk for visually impaired participants.

The 5-digit registration number for this event is: 57951

The Sympathizer Self-Reflection Questions

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki MurakamiThe Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

“They carried all the emotional baggage of men who might die. Grief, terror, love, longing – these were intangibles, but the intangibles had their own mass and specific gravity, they had tangible weight,. They carried shameful memories. They carried the common secret of cowardice… Men killed, and died, because they were embarrassed not to.” A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds and lives since it burst onto the literary scene, The Things They Carried is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling.

Note: Audio book version of material for this event is available at either Library circulation desk for visually impaired participants.

The 5-digit registration number for this event is: 57952

The Things They Carried Self-Reflection Questions


The Woman in the Dunes

What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes

In What It Is Like to Go to War, Karl Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at the experience and ordeal of com bat, critically examining how we might better prepare our young soldiers for war. War is as old as humankind, but in the past, warriors were prepared for battle by ritual, religion, and literature – which also helped bring them home. In a compelling narrative, Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings – from Homer to Mahabharata to Jung. He makes it clear just how poorly prepared our nineteen-year-old warriors – mainly men but increasingly women – are for the psychological and spiritual aspects of their journey.

Note: Audio book version of material for this event is available at either Library circulation desk for visually impaired participants.

The 5-digit registration number for this event is: 57953

What It Is Like to Go to War Self-Reflection Questions